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What is factorising?

By Lee Mansfield on the 11th of June, 2012

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    Refine By ptriifak on the 10th of November, 2015

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    Refine By ptriifak on the 10th of November, 2015

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    Refine By ptriifak on the 10th of November, 2015

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    Factorising means splitting up into it's factors (all the things that multiply together to make it).
    In this topic, it means putting brackets into an expression, like in the example below.

    Example
    Factorise 3x+6

    Answer
    3(x+2)

    Refine By Lee Mansfield on the 13th of June, 2012

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    Factorising means to breakdown a number into its individual factors. Example: The number 12 has for its factors 6 and 2 because 6 x 2 = 12. It also has 4 and 3 because 4 x 3 = 12. It also has 12 and 1 as its factors because 12 x 1 = 12.

    Refine By pranit on the 17th of January, 2013

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    This is a common method used in solving quadratic equations. By fractorising you break down an equation to the lowest power structure. The higher the power the more work you have to complete in order to solve the problem.

    Here is a example of a quadratic equation solved by fractorising:

    x2 + x + 2

    (x-1) * (x+2)=0

    X = -2 and 1

     

     

     

     

    Refine By Lini on the 19th of January, 2013

Suggested reading…

Simplify expressions with surds into the form a + b3

Be warned this topic is Chuck Norris hard. Make sure you've done the related topics below before you try and get your head round this one...

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So if you put a square root sign around a number that is not a square number, then what you have written is a surd.

e.g. √10 is a surd, because 10 is not a square number. √9 is not a surd, because 9 is a square number, so you can write √9= 3

Even if the number under the square root sign is not a square number, it can still be simplified.

Write the starting number as a product of two new numbers, where one of them is a square number (e.g. 45 -> 9 x 5).  Take the root of the square number, and write it outside of the root sign

e.g. √45 = √(9×5)=3√5

Follow the links below to see how this topic has appeared in past exam papers

 

AQA Unit 2 March 2011 (H) - Page 11, Question 17

Taking IT global

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